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Global Releaf

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Larson-Juhl Global ReLeaf Tree-planting Initiative

Since 1991 Larson-Juhl has funded the planting of over than 400,000 trees in more than 29 unique Global ReLeaf ecosystem restoration projects within the United States and around the world.

2011

Name:Upper St. Joe Restoration
Trees: 13,000
State:
Organization: Summary:

Name:Tobaggan Ridge Restoration
Trees: 12,000
State:
Organization: Summary:

2010

Name: Powell Whitebark Pine Planting
Trees: 15,000
State: ID
Organization:Clearwater National Forest
Summary: Like many other National Forests, the Clearwater National Forests whitebark pine population has been in the decline because of white pine blister rust and the mountain pine beetle. The Regional Tree Improvement Program has bred whitebark pine trees that are fairly resistant to the white pine blister pathogen. 34,000 of these trees will be planted throughout 150 acres of land to re-establish the whitebark pine population in Clearwater National Forest. The whitebark pine is a keystone tree species for this area, providing a very important food source to local wildlife, stabilizing the soil, and protracting snow melt at high elevations.

Name: Reforestation for Monarchs & Watershed Protection
Trees: 10,000
Country: Mexico
Organization: Alliance for Chesapeake Bay
Summary: This project will plant 200,000 trees on 198 acres of land in Michoacan, Mexico, helping to reforest two distinct areas of Michoacans highlands. The first area being reforested is a Monarch butterfly biosphere reserve. The Monarch butterfly spends its winter in this habitat, but the recent human population surge in the area has caused people to move on to the reserve. The second location contains two highland lakes that are very important to the encompassing watershed. Along with reforesting these two areas, this project provides an educational outreach program for the local communities to help them understand the importance of protecting the areas trees.

2009

Name: Manchester State Forest Habitat Restoration
Trees: 6,000
State: SC
Organization:South Carolina Department of Natural Resources
Summary: seedlings This project will help restore a native forest by planting 6,000 longleaf pines and native hardwoods. Other areas will be extensively managed for native grasses critical to grassland birds such as the prairie warbler, field sparrow, Eastern meadowlark, and many others. Population trends of these grassland birds will be monitored in order to evaluate effectiveness of applied management practices.

Name: Urban Tree Canopy Initiative
Trees: 4,600
State: MD
Organization: Alliance for Chesapeake Bay
Summary: Between 2008 and 2010 the Alliance for the Chesapeake Bay (ACB) will plant 12,000 seedlings on park, private, and institutional lands, and 1,000 street trees in urban areas of Maryland and Virginia. ACB will work directly with local watershed groups to recruit volunteers, establish tree planting programs, and ensure the long term maintenance of the trees. This project will reduce the urban heat island effect and decrease the stormwater runoff, nitrogen and phosphorous that eventually flows into the Chesapeake Bay. ACB will also partner with the Maryland Forest Service and the Virginia Department of Forestry.

Name: Butler II
Trees: 7,400
State: CA
Organization: San Bernardino National Forest
San Bernardino national ForestSummary: The Butler II Fire and Slide Fire burned over 27,000 acres in the San Bernardino National Forest. These fires destroyed the seed source, so there can be no natural regeneration. It is typical in these areas that brush species will start to grow. Planting over 85,000 seedlings in the region will reestablish conifer vegetation before the site is overrun with brush. The San Bernardino National Forest is home to many unique communities that contain endemic species that are federally listed, state listed or forest sensitive species. It is also one of the most frequented forests in the nation for recreation, including summer camps and cabins.

Name: Pine and Waiska Watershed Headwater Riparian Planting
Trees: 7,000
State: MI
Organization: Hiwatha National Forest
Summary: The Hiwatha National Forest hand planted 15,000 long-lived conifers within 500 feet of streams including West Branch Waiska River at the mouth and above White Creek. The planting will help counter the effect of historic logging, help return the zone to pre-settlement vegetation, and enhance cold-water fisheries habitat.

2008

Name: Gunflint Corridor
Trees: 25,000
State: MN
Organization: Superior National Forest
Summary: The Gunflint corridor is a State of Minnesota scenic byway that bisects the Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness. The highway is historic because it follows Native American Footpaths that are centuries old and now serves a significant portion of Cook County residents and businesses. Not only was there a windstorm in 1999 that caused a 1000 square mile blowdown, but also the Ham Lake Fire in 2007 burned the area, increasing the mortality rate. The Superior National Forest partnered with American Forests to plant over 180,000 trees.

2007

Name: Sumatran Orangutan
Trees: 25,000
Country: Indonesia
Organization: SOS-OIC Nursery
Summary: Sumatra tree plantingThe SOS-OIC Nursery and Replanting Project, for Aceh and North Sumatra, will pioneer local community based nursery centers to support the rehabilitation of degraded areas of forest and coastal areas, including those affected by the recent tsunami disaster in Aceh. It is estimated that 64 million hectares of forest land in Indonesian have been destroyed in the last 50 years, over 80% of remaining forest habitat in the past 20 years alone. The majority of this is due to the logging industry, both illegal and legal, as well as from other means such as fires and natural disasters. In addition, recent estimates suggest that there are around 30-40 hectares of coastal mangrove areas destroyed from both the recent tsunami as well as illegal logging activities. The speed of deforestation is showing no sign of slowing down. Around 15 years ago, an average of 1.7 million hectares of forest were cleared annually in Indonesia, increasing to 2 million hectares by the year 2000. It is the intention of the SOS-OIC Nursery and Replanting Project to help protect these remaining areas of forest habitat by implementing reforestation projects in these degraded areas, as well as areas destroyed by the recent devastating earthquake and resulting tsunami on Dec 26th, 2004. Partnered with American Forests, SOS planted 42,000 trees during this year’s restoration efforts.

2006

Name: Flint Hills
Trees: 12,500
State: KS
Organization: Flint Hills National Wildlife Refuge
Summary:Flint Hills National Wildlife Refuge This project will expand riparian forests at the Flint Hills National Wildlife Refuge in eastern Kansas by restoring bur oak and pecan in areas that were farmed for several decades. In the mid-1800s, forests occurred along the rivers in eastern Kansas, with tall grass prairie covering the rest of the landscape. U.S. General Land Office surveys (1856) describe the riparian vegetation along the Neosho River as being dominated by bur oak, with green ash, pecan, American elm, and hackberry in lesser numbers. When much of eastern Kansas was converted to agriculture, riparian forests, with the high fertility soils, fell to the axe and plow. One can scarcely find a 300-acre block of forest anywhere along a 200-mile stretch of the Neosho River in eastern Kansas. Flint Hills NWR provides an excellent opportunity to remedy that situation. In 2006 American Forests helped to plant 36,000 trees in riparian restoration.

Name: Lower Rio Grande National Wildlife Refuge
Trees: 12,500
State: TX
Organization: Lower Rio Grande National Wildlife Refuge
Summary: Lower Rio Grande National Wildlife RefugeThe Lower Rio Grande Valley (LRGV) National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) follows the last 275 river miles of the Rio Grande. Both the Central and Mississippi flyways funnel through the southern tip of Texas and many species of birds reach their extreme northernmost range here. In addition, subtropic, temperate, coastal, and desert influences converge at this juncture, creating an ideal situation for species diversity. Considered one of the most biologically diverse NWRs in the continental United States, LRGV represents 11 distinct biotic communities that are host or home to 1,100 types of plants, 700 vertebrate species (including 484 bird species), and more than 300 species of butterflies. In 2006 AMERICAN FORESTS' Global ReLeaf program continued its restoration efforts on the Lower Rio Grande Valley National Wildlife Refuge. Less than 5 percent of this unique ecosystem remains and planting approximately 30,000 additional seedlings will increase habitat for endangered species such as the ocelot, jaguarundi, aplomado falcon, red-headed parrot, and indigo snake.

2005

Name: Mountain Communities Wildfire ReLeaf
Trees: 10,000
State: CA
Organization: Mojave RCD, California Department of Forestry
Summary: In the San Bernardino Mountains, approximately 12 million trees weakened by six years of drought are dead and dying due to stress and the bark beetle epidemic. In the fall of 2003, devastating wildfires swept through sections of the San Bernardino Mountains leaving behind areas with close to 100 percent tree mortality. The “Mountain Communities Wildfire ReLeaf Project” is a long-term program that will continue to develop and implement a comprehensive reforestation program in the Southern California Mountains. The mortality rate from the bark beetle epidemic will continue to increase as the infestation spreads, and the continuing threat of devastating wildfires in these areas will increase as well. The number of trees that will eventually be needed to restore the forest at this time has been estimated to be over 650,000. American Forests is working in partnership with the Mojave Resource Conservation District, and the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection to reforest the area with 62,000 trees this year.

Name: Lower Rio Grande National Wildlife Refuge
Trees: 10,000
State: TX
Organization: Lower Rio Grande National Wildlife Refuge
Summary: The Lower Rio Grande Valley (LRGV) National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) follows the last 275 river miles of the Rio Grande. Both the Central and Mississippi flyways funnel through the southern tip of Texas and many species of birds reach their extreme northernmost range here. In addition, subtropic, temperate, coastal, and desert influences converge at this juncture, creating an ideal situation for species diversity. Considered one of the most biologically diverse NWRs in the continental United States, LRGV represents 11 distinct biotic communities that are host or home to 1,100 types of plants, 700 vertebrate species (including 484 bird species), and more than 300 species of butterflies. This will be a multi-year effort to expand on the less than 5 percent of this unique ecosystem that remains. Plantings will increase habitat for endangered species such as the ocelot, jaguarundi, aplomado falcon, red-headed parrot, and indigo snake.

2004

Name: Mountains to Sound Greenway
Trees: 13,700
State: WA
Organization: Lower Rio Grande National Wildlife Refuge
Summary: These plantings occurred at several sites along Issaquah Creek. Issaquah Creek is a salmon bearing stream that feeds into the south end of Lake Sammamish. Issaquah Creek tributaries run off of Tiger, Squak and Taylor Mountains, and it runs through the City of Issaquah and enters Lake Sammamish at Lake Sammamish State Park. The City of Issaquah has spent the past ten years purchasing land along the stream to protect water quality and salmon habitat. American Forests helped plant sites that the city has acquired. The exact sites are known as: the Johnson Parcel, Sycamore Site, Hanson Property, Beebe Property, Newport Way Bridge, Gilman Area, and Cassel. This project involves planting mixed hardwood and deciduous trees over a multi-year period.

Name: Nooksack Salmon Enhancement
Trees: 6,300
State: WA
Organization: Nooksack Salmon Enhancement
Summary: Habitat restoration projects include replanting vegetation along stream banks, placing woody debris and gravel in streambeds (to reinforce spawning areas), stabilizing eroding stream banks, and removing barriers to salmon passage mostly on private land. To date, over 22 miles of stream habitat have been improved by more than 150 projects. Over a five-year period, 7,000-8,000 spruce, willow, dogwood, hawthorn, alder, cedar, and maple will be planted each year. This year’s plantings also occurred in the Kendall, Fishtrap, Black Slough, Betrand, Tenmile, Schell, Squalicum Creeks near the towns of Nooksack, Fernadale, and Bellingham in Whatcom County.

2003

Name: Nooksack Salmon Enhancement
Trees: 7,000
State: WA
Organization: Nooksack Salmon Enhancement
Summary: Habitat restoration projects include replanting vegetation along stream banks, placing woody debris and gravel in streambeds (to reinforce spawning areas), stabilizing eroding stream banks, and removing barriers to salmon passage, mostly on private land. To date, over 22 miles of stream habitat has been improved by more than 150 projects. Over a five-year period, 7,000-8,000 spruce, willow, dogwood, hawthorn, alder, cedar, and maple will be planted each year. This year’s plantings occurred in the Kendall, Fishtrap, Black Slough, Betrand, Tenmile, Schell, Squalicum Creeks near the towns of Nooksack, Fernadale, and Bellingham in Whatcom County.

Name: Applegate River
Trees: 13,000
State: OR
Summary: Decades of timber extraction, agricultural intensification, and residential development have damaged riparian habitats in the Applegate basin. In particular, the abundance and diversity of species in native biotic communities have declined. To mitigate this damage, trees will be planted over the next two years on riparian properties near the affected areas. The planting of riparian buffers will improve water quality and stream habitat and provide contiguous migratory routes for wildlife and nesting habitats for birds.

2002

Name: Mangrove Wetlands
Trees: 20,000
Country: Indonesia
Summary: The mangrove forests of Indonesia are the most extensive of any country in the world and extend over 10 million acres. However, many mangrove forest areas are being converted to aquaculture ponds and the mangrove forests are rapidly declining. Forces like fish and shrimp farming, industry and housing construction, intensive agriculture and mass tourism result in rapid erosion and degradation of the coast and riverbanks. This project will plant some 20,000 mangrove and sea-pine seedlings along the river banks of Rambut's river, the estuarine, the coasts and in brackish-water fish ponds in Lawang Rejo, Pesantren and Nyamplung Sari villages, Pemalang, Central Java. These areas that have been severely affected by deforestation and will provide essential habitat and breeding grounds for endangered and threatened species such as crocodiles, dragonflies, white egret, and lotuses. In addition, project partner Wetlands International will be working with local grassroots groups, villagers, and local government foresters and officials to spread the message of sustainable living and its relation to a healthy environment.

2001

Name: Mangrove Wetlands
Trees: 20,000
Country: Indonesia
Summary: Pending

2000

Name: Mangrove Wetlands
Trees: 20,000
Country: Indonesia
Summary: Pending

1999

Name: Monk Environmental Education
Trees: 20,000
Country: Cambodia
Summary: In Cambodia 80% of the population live in rural areas and depend largely on natural resources. Trees provide many of these resources, including firewood, watershed protection, building materials, fruits and traditional medicine. Unfortunately, between 1980 and 2000, the forest cover in Cambodia decreased from 70% to 30%. To combat this problem, in 2000 and 2001 Mlup Baitong planted thousands of native tree seedlings. The trees were planted on land that belongs to the Pudrie pagoda in the Phnom Sruich district. A tree planting ceremony was conducted to demonstrate the importance of reforestation. Monks, villagers, school children and local officials attended the ceremony and all the participants planted seedlings after the ceremony. A local committee was formed to manage the project and monks will continue to care for the seedlings. A portion of the trees were grown from locally collected seed and grown in local nurseries run by monks and schools. This local production of seedlings was an effort to make the project more sustainable. The Farmers Association of Kompong Speu also partnered in this project.

1998

Name: Esmeraldas Reforestation 10,000
Trees:
Country: Ecuador
Summary: Esmeraldas, Ecuador is 18,675 trees greener, thanks to a tree planting project by Fundacion Natura. The region surrounding the city contains the largest remnant of tropical rain forest on the Ecuadorian Coast. However, deforestation from timber production, shrimp exploitation and disorderly urban growth created danger from landslides and floods. Twelve different species of tropical trees were planted in seven different 'barrios' or neighborhoods in the city. The trees were planted by the Fundacion Natura technical team, community members, students, teachers, municipality and university employees and Ecuadorian Army conscripts. This project will reforest public spaces, restore parks, protect against landslides and floods, improve the environment of marginal neighborhoods, promote tourism, prevent erosion, provide clean air and water and educate students and the community.

1997

Name: Fruit Tree Plantation at Niamina Samhung – Phase Two
Trees: 10,000
Country: Gambia
Summary: The Gambian Rural Development Agency (GARDA) is a group focused on bettering the lives of rural women in Gambia. They worked in conjunction with American Forests to plant fruit trees in the North Bank Division of the Niumi District, a rural area of Gambia. This tree planting was targeted at community members who depend on farming for their daily survival. In conjunction with GARDA, community members identified the needs of the community and selected tree types and locations based on these needs. Long term care of these trees will be done by females in the adjacent areas along with youth groups. Training will be provided by GARDA. The area where the trees were planted can also be used as a community garden and since all of the trees selected were fruit bearing, the community can directly benefit from the project and supplement their diets.

Name: Mananga Watershed
Trees: 10,000
Country: Philippines
Summary: The purpose of this project was to reestablish the vegetative cover of the Mananga watershed area in order to reduce soil erosion and ensure a clean water supply in Cebu, Philippines. The deforestation of the tropical hardwood trees in the area dates to the Spanish colonization era when the trees were used as lumber to build Spanish galleons. In addition, the local villagers often use inappropriate farming systems that degrade the land. This project will restore the watershed through tree planting and teach local villagers appropriate upland farming techniques.

1996

Name: Undesignated
Trees: 10,000
Country: United States

Name: Carapungo Tree Planting
Trees: 8,000
Country: Ecuador
Summary: In 1996 and 1997, Fundacion Natura of Ecuador planted 15,000 trees in Carapungo, just within the northern limit of the city of Quito. The native tree planting was a community effort which involved men, women and children. The trees will beautify the city streets; shade gardens, day care centers and schools; and serve as a protective barrier between the city and a steep ravine. Additionally, the municipality donated metallic meshing to protect the ravine behind the planted trees. Besides tree planting, Fundacion Natura educated citizens as to the benefits of urban forests and instructed them in long-term tree care.

Name: Green Shadow
Trees: 2,000
Country: Romania
Summary: The project aims to develop the landscape along the Husnicioara mine-path and coal transporting strip by planting a tree curtain. The site for planting was chosen in this region (located on the shores of the Danube in SW Romania) because of intense deforestation and soil erosion. Planting a tree curtain is one of the most effective forms of ecological reconstruction for such an area. Tree species were chosen that would afford the highest benefits. The site was prepared by leveling the ground and fertilizing the soil, and 5,000 seedlings were planted. Also contributing to the project was the Society for Silvic Progress, who provided forest expertise. The 'Green Shadow' tree curtain improved the landscape for both mine workers and people living in neighboring villages.

1995

Name: Undesignated
Trees: 10,000
Country: United States

Name: Pichincha Reforestation
Trees: 5,000
Country: Ecuador
Summary: This project in Ecuador planted trees in various marginal urban zones of the capital city, Quito. These areas are inhabited by poor citizens of the city, and due to housing construction, there has unfortunately been severe deforestation. The deforestation caused landslides in the rainy seasons and dust pollution in the dry seasons. 5,000 trees were planted to combat these problems as well as to provide medicinal products, edible products (fruits and nuts), beautification and living fences. In addition, the project will raise awareness for the importance and benefits of vegetation. An estimated 800 families living in the sector will benefit, as well as 1,000's of inhabitants living below the project area. The trees were planted by community volunteers and the municipality of Quito.

Name: Fruit Tree Plantation at Niamina Samhung – Phase One
Trees: 5,000
Country: Gambia
Summary: The Gambian Rural Development Agency (GARDA) is a group focused on bettering the lives of rural women in Gambia. They worked in conjunction with American Forests to plant fruit trees in the North Bank Division of the Niumi District, a rural area of Gambia. This tree planting was targeted at community members who depend on farming for their daily survival. In conjunction with GARDA, community members identified the needs of the community and selected tree types and locations based on these needs. Long-term care of these trees will be done by females in the adjacent areas along with youth groups. Training will be provided by GARDA. The area where the trees were planted can also be used as a community garden and since all of the trees selected were fruit bearing, the community can directly benefit from the project and supplement their diets.

1994

Name: Undesignated
Trees: 20,000

1991-1993

Name: Hakalau National Wildlife Refuge I
Trees: 20,500
State: HI
Summary: Re-establishing native hardwoods (Acacia koa) to provide habitat for native Hawaiian birds is the main purpose of the Hakalau Forest National Wildlife Refuge reforestation project on the Big Island of Hawaii. Koa helps create an overstory so native plants can recapture the site from non-native vegetative competition. Seed collection, nursery production and difficulties created by El Nino weather suggested a 5-year time frame. 32,300 trees were planted in 1992, the first year of the project.

Name: Blackwater River State Forest I
State: FL
Summary: Blackwater River State Forest was acquired in the early 1930s by the U.S. Government as a land-use project. It was later deeded to the State of Florida. It is Florida's largest state forest and a true multiple-use forest with timber management, recreation, and wildlife management all playing important roles. Blackwater contains one of the largest stands of longleaf pine remaining in the United States. The Division of Forestry planned to convert thousands of acres of slash pine plantations back to longleaf pine. The magnificent virgin longleaf pine forest of the Southeastern United States has been depleted to a small portion of its original acreage. It has truly become an endangered ecosystem, and it appears that its sole chance for continuing to exist is through its perpetuation on public lands. The Division of Forestry took steps to protect and expand the range of the longleaf pine by planting 218,000 seedlings on 300 acres in 1992 as part of a long-term restoration project.

Name: Darton College
State: GA
Summary: Native forest cover of improved loblolly pine and mixed hardwoods were re-established on a 20 acre parcel of the Darton College campus in Georgia to enhance ecosystem diversity and educational opportunities. Heavy site preparation was required to help eradicate the invasive kudzu plant, which has been successfully eliminated.